Sucker Punch

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Babydoll (Emily Browning) sets out against numerous bosses in video game-style battles, fighting dragons and robots alike in her quest for freedom. Babydoll (Emily Browning) sets out against numerous bosses in video game-style battles, fighting dragons and robots alike in her quest for freedom.

Director Zack Snyder’s "Sucker Punch" forms its own niche within multi-genre films by seeming to channel both Alan Moore and eastern spiritualism — if they feel in love with World War-era airplanes and modern firearms.

Steven Shibuya and Snyder co-wrote Sucker Punch before production on Watchmen began in 2007. It was Snyder's work on Watchmen (and subsequently 300) that lead to Warner Bros. agreeing to offer distribution on Sucker Punch, making the original screenplay a reality.

Snyder set forth to reassemble the production team for Watchmen which included the talents of costume designer Michael Wilkinson (300 & Tron: Legacy), composer Tyler Bates (300, The Devil's Rejects, & Dawn of the Dead), and cinematographer Larry Fong (300). Snyder also made a bold casting choice by deciding to have an all-female ensemble.

The story centers around Babydoll (Emily Browning) who is committed to an insane asylum by her stepfather. She must contend with a bribed orderly (Oscar Issac) who has scheduled her for a lobotomy in five days. Escaping into her own personal dream world, Babydoll meets the wise man (Scott Glenn) who provides her with an escape plan. Enlisting the help of fellow inmates Rocket (Jena Malone), Amber (Jamie Chung), Blondie (Vanessa Hudgens), and Sweet Pea (Abbie Cornish), Babydoll sets out against numerous bosses in video game-style battles, fighting dragons and robots alike in her quest for freedom.

The execution of the film's transitions from the real world into Babydoll's fantasy are flawless. The viewer will also be surprised by the musical feel that arises within the film. This is thanks to composer Marius de Vries of Moulin Rouge fame, who partnered with Bates to create the score. All the elements harmoniously align with the visual scape to create a world best known by dreamers. Snyder's only wish is that he could've offered more.

Sucker Punch succeeds in its intentions by offering the viewer an unparalleled visual outlet — a cinematic dreamscape to rival cinematic dreamscapes. And despite the obvious lack of plot and character development, don't be reluctant about taking a venture down the rabbit hole with this film because Snyder did have to edit it seven times just to get a PG-13 rating. So, if you're willing to accept that everyone in this Wonderland is completely mad then you'll be more than prepared for this flick.






Featured writer

Erika Livingstone

Erika was raised and currently lives in the corporate wiles of Western Canada. She has studied Literature at the University of Calgary, specializing in Cyborg theory. Her great loves in life include red champagne, super spicy condiments, and the mad scientist who lives down the hill from her.



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gothic, goth, movie review, sucker punch